Zoe Tasia

Fiction Author

Month: November 2018

Dead Shrinks Don’t Talk, A Mother-and-Me Mystery by Sandra Gardner

Dead Shrinks Don't Talk: A Mother and Me Mystery by [Gardner, Sandra]

Marabella Vinegar is late for her therapist appointment—thanks to her mother. Normally, this pain in the tookus would be par for the course. After all, most of Marabella’s sessions are spent addressing her relationship with said relative except, Mama Vinegar died.  A week ago.

After tucking her not-so-dead mother in for a nap on the couch, apparently ghost travel is taxing, Marabella rushes to Dr. Ditstein’s office anxious for answers. None are forthcoming because she finds her supportive shrink murdered. Any guess who is the prime suspect?

Marabella’s ambivalent relationship with her mother is captured perfectly by the author. Mom drives her nuts. But she loves her. But she drives her NUTS. The balance is perfect. I “get” both characters and am sympathetic.

I’m a big mystery series fan, but one of my complaints is that, in some cases, the main character doesn’t grow. I can’t say this for Marabella in Dead Shrinks Don’t Talk.  Happily, Marabella is adaptive and determine. She is a flawed character that you can’t help but root for because, aren’t we all flawed? And, fyi, she solves the mystery. Let’s hear it for Team Marabella! A wonderful read and I can’t wait for more from this author.

Uthuru (The Traveler Chronicles Book 1) by Paul Biagi III

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Uthuru is a science fiction novel about Mitchell Surrey, a man accused of a murder he didn’t commit. He travels to space for the proof needed to exonerate him and, not only does he find it, he also discovers answers to the over one-hundred-year-old mystery of the alien attack that came to be known as the Traveler War.

I enjoyed this first person POV tale. The world building was detailed and believable, the main character, resourceful and easy to relate to, and the reason for the aliens’ hostilities, unique. Being a fan of the Alien movies, I loved the horror elements in the story.

Despite the new sci-fi technological terms, I had no trouble following the plot, though the author has thoughtfully included a glossary. Never a dull moment, this was a quick read. In some ways, I am reminded of the movie, The Martian, because Mitchell must be self-reliant and spends a goodly part of the book on his own. I strongly recommend this novel and, since this is book 1, can’t wait to see what else this author has in store for Mitchell.

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